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Briscoe, Edwin W.
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Briscoe, Edwin W.
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Source: Past and Present of Pike County, Page 528-529

EDWIN W. BRISCOE

Edwin W. Briscoe, of Pleasant Hill, is a veteran of the great Civil war, in which he valiantly fought for the old flag of the Union. He is a native son of Pike county, his birth having occurred in Martinsburg township, January 31, 1843. His father, Edward Briscoe, was a native of Kentucky, born in 1810. He came to Illinois when a young man in 1828, and was married in McDonough county to Miss Nancy Ann Hardin, a native of Kentucky. Later he became a resident of Pike county, following the occupation of farming in Martinsburg township, where he reared his family and spent his last years, passing away on the 27th of August, 1855, when in the prime of life. In the family were three sons and a daughter: H. H. Briscoe, of Martinsburg; E. W., of this review; and Tom I. Briscoe, of Colorado. The daughter is Mrs. Margaret E. Steward.

Edwin W. Briscoe was reared in the county of his nativity and remained with his mother until twenty years of age. On the 8th of October, 1864, he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a member of Company C, Ninety-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he went to the south. Not long afterward he was taken ill and was in the hospital at Memphis with measles. Later pneumonia set in, and he came near to death, but eventually he recovered and rejoined his regiment in April, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama, continuing with the command until the succeeding autumn, when he was honorably discharged at New Orleans. He was a faithful soldier, always found at his post of duty save when ill in the hospital; and he never wavered in his allegiance to the stars and stripes.

Following his return to the north, Mr. Briscoe engaged in work by the month as a farm hand for several years. In 1869 he went to southwestern Missouri, where he operated a farm, and in 1870 he removed to Kansas, where he followed the same pursuit. He was married in the Sunflower state on the 21st of May, 1874, to Miss Clementine Beasley, a native of Marion county, Illinois, and a daughter of Wesley and Rachel Beasley, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Tennessee. Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Briscoe located in Greene county, Missouri, where they remained for a year and then removed to Chautauqua county, where they resided until 1880. In that year they went to Eureka Springs, Arkansas, for the benefit of Mr. Briscoe's health, continuing at that point for four years, after which they returned to Springfield, Missouri, where for six years and seven months he was employed in the railroad shops of the Frisco Company. On the expiration of that period he again came to Pike county, Illinois, settling at Pleasant Hill, where he purchased a lot and built a residence.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Briscoe have been born three children: Maude, who is a proficient nurse and resides in St. Louis, Missouri; Daisy, the wife of William Cragmiles, of Pleasant Hill, by whom she has three children, Maudie, Claudie and Lawrence. Mr. and Mrs. Briscoe also lost a son, Claude, who died at the age of twelve years. In his political views Mr. Briscoe is a republican, having given stalwart support to the party since casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864, while on a furlough home. He and his wife and daughters' are members of the Methodist Episcopal church; and he belongs to the Grand Army post. He takes a deep interest in church work, and also in the fraternal organization with which he is connected and is an esteemed representative of both. His good qualities of heart and mind have won him the respect of those with whom he has come in contact, and he enjoys in large measure the warm esteem of many friends.

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