Adams County ILTidbits Project

     


Register | Forgot Password
Gillhouse, Carl Edward
Data, images, etc., found on the PikeCoILGenWeb.org website is for the use of individual researchers only. It is NOT for other groups to copy and place on their website.


Previous Article | Next Article

Share
Gillhouse, Carl Edward
Contributed by Adams County ILGenWeb
Print | Save | Discuss (0) | E-Mail | Report



Carl Edward Gillhouse Biography


Carl Edward Gillhouse is one of the prosperous farm owners in that splendid agricultural district southeast of Quincy in Payson Township. He is a member of the well known Gillhouse family, a son of Ernest Gillhouse, one of the oldest men in Adams County and concerning whom more particular mention is made on other pages.

Carl Edward Gillhouse, whose home is sixteen miles southeast of Quincy, was born on his father's old farm in the same vicinity August 9, 1867. He grew up in that district, attended the local schools, and worked with and lived on his father's place until his marriage.

October 19, 1890, Clara Olive Journey became his bride. She was a young lady of nineteen at the time. She was born in Pike County, Illinois, a daughter of Peter A. and Rose A. (Donelson) Journey. Her parents are both now deceased. After his marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gillhouse spent four years on his father's farm in Pike County. In 1896 they moved to their present place, the original Polk Whitcomb farm of eighty-five acres. Altogether Mr. Gillhouse has more than 200 acres devoted to general farming, including eighty acres of bottom land. He grows from ninety to 100 acres of wheat every season.

Mr. Gillhouse is also a director of the local telephone company, has been a director of the local schools four years, and is a democrat in politics. Mrs. Gillhouse is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They have two children, Gertrude and Gladys, the latter still at home. Gertrude is the wife of H. T. Groh, and has one child, Rosa Gertrude.

Quincy and Adams County History and Representative Men, Vol II, by David Wilcox. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1919, p. 1163.

Previous Article | Next Article




Quick Reply
Your Name:
Your Comment:


You may use BB Codes in your message.
Anti-Spam Image:
Type the letters and numbers shown on the left into the box on the right (this is to prevent automated submissions).
security image


Members currently reading this thread:

Submitted: 06/01/10

Views: 49 views. Averaging 0 per day.
In the most recent 30 day period, there've been 0 views.

Previous Article | Next Article